Statement of Faith | Tell a Friend about Us | Color Scheme:    
Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Join Now!  |  Login
  Our Sponsors

• Biblical Hebrew study & learning software:

• Bible software for Believing Study: SwordSearcher

• Help change the hearts of people one book at a time! Click to find out how!

• Looking for that lost cantata? Let US find it!

  Study Resources

• Interlinear Bible

• Parallel Bible

• Daily Reading Plan

• Devotionals

• Commentaries

• Concordances

• Dictionaries

• Encyclopedias

• Lexicons

• History

• Sermon Essentials

• Audio Resources

• Religious Artwork

  SL Forums

• Apologetic Forum

• Christian Living

• Ministry Forum

• Evangelism Forum

• Passage Forum

• Help Forum

  Other Resources

• Advertise with SL

• FREE Resources

• Information

• Set Preferences

• Font Resources

• Contacting SL



Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament

Search This Resource
Verse 2
Chapter 2

  Printer friendly version
Additional Resources
 • Adam Clark Commentary
 • Burton Coffman
 • Barnes' New Testament
 • Darby's Synopsis
 • Gill's Exposition
 • Jamieson, Fausset, Brown
 • Matthew Henry Complete
 • Matthew Henry Concise
 • People's New Testament
 • Treasury of Scripture
 • Wesley's Explanatory Notes
Buy This Resource
 Show me more …
1 Corinthians 1:1

Called to be an apostle (klhtov apostolov).
Verbal adjective klhtov from kalew, without einai, to be. Literally,

a called apostle (Romans 1:1),
not so-called, but one whose apostleship is due not to himself or to men (Galatians 1:1), but to God,

through the will of God (dia telhmatov tou teou).
The intermediate (dia, duo, two) agent between Paul's not being Christ's apostle and becoming one was God's will (telhma, something willed of God), God's command (1 Timothy 1:1). Paul knows that he is not one of the twelve apostles, but he is on a par with them because, like them, he is chosen by God. He is an apostle of Jesus Christ or Christ Jesus (MSS. vary here, later epistles usually Christ Jesus). The refusal of the Judaizers to recognize Paul as equal to the twelve made him the more careful to claim his position. Bengel sees here Paul's denial of mere human authority in his position and also of personal merit: Namque mentione Dei excluditur auctoramentum humanum, mentione Voluntatis Dei, meritum Pauli.

Our brother (o adelpov).
Literally, the brother, but regular Greek idiom for our brother. This Sosthenes, now with Paul in Ephesus, is probably the same Sosthenes who received the beating meant for Paul in Corinth (Acts 18:17). If so, the beating did him good for he is now a follower of Christ. He is in no sense a co-author of the Epistle, but merely associated with Paul because they knew him in Corinth. He may have been compelled by the Jews to leave Corinth when he, a ruler of the synagogue, became a Christian. See 1 Thessalonians 1:1 for the mention of Silas and Timothy in the salutation. Sosthenes could have been Paul's amanuensis for this letter, but there is no proof of it.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 1:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". <>. Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960.


Dead links, typos, or HTML errors should be sent to
Suggestions about making this resource more useful should be sent to

   Powered by LightSpeed Technology

Copyright © 2001-2018,