Statement of Faith | Tell a Friend about Us | Color Scheme:    
Sunday, December 15, 2019

Join Now!  |  Login
  Our Sponsors

• Looking for that lost cantata? Let US find it!

• Help change the hearts of people one book at a time! Click to find out how!

• Bible software for Believing Study: SwordSearcher

• Biblical Hebrew study & learning software: BMSoftware.com

 
  Study Resources

• Interlinear Bible

• Parallel Bible

• Daily Reading Plan

• Devotionals

• Commentaries

• Concordances

• Dictionaries

• Encyclopedias

• Lexicons

• History

• Sermon Essentials

• Audio Resources

• Religious Artwork

 
  SL Forums

• Apologetic Forum

• Christian Living

• Ministry Forum

• Evangelism Forum

• Passage Forum

• Help Forum

 
  Other Resources

• Advertise with SL

• FREE Resources

• Information

• Set Preferences

• Font Resources

• Contacting SL

 

 

Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament

Search This Resource
 
 
 
Navigator
PreviousNext
 Verse 8
Chapter 8
Verse 10
Chapter 10

  
 
  Printer friendly version
 
Additional Resources
 
 • Adam Clark Commentary
 • Burton Coffman
 • Barnes' New Testament
 • Darby's Synopsis
 • Gill's Exposition
 • Jamieson, Fausset, Brown
 • Matthew Henry Complete
 • Matthew Henry Concise
 • People's New Testament
 • Treasury of Scripture
 • Wesley's Explanatory Notes
 
Buy This Resource
 
Hardcover$77.00
 Show me more …
 
1 Corinthians 9:9

Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn (ou pimwseiv boun alownta).
Quotation from Deuteronomy 25:4. Prohibition by ou and the volitive future indicative. Pimow, to muzzle (from pimov, a muzzle for dogs and oxen), appears first in Aristophanes (Clouds, 592) and not again till LXX and N.T., though in the papyri also. Evidently a vernacular word, perhaps a slang word. See metaphorical use in Matthew 22:12,34. Alownta is present active participle of the old verb aloaw, occurs in the N.T. only here (and verse 10) and 1 Timothy 5:18 where it is also quoted. It is probably derived from alov or alon, a threshing-floor, or the disc of a shield or of the sun and moon. The Egyptians according to the monuments, used oxen to thresh out the grain, sometimes donkeys, by pulling a drag over the grain. The same process may be found today in Andalusia, Italy, Palestine. A hieroglyphic inscription at Eileithyas reads: "Thresh ye yourselves, O oxen, Measures of grain for yourselves, Measures of grain for your masters." Note mh melei expects the negative answer, impersonal verb with dative and genitive cases (teoi, God, bown, oxen).
Altogether (pantwv).
But here probably with the notion of doubtless or assuredly. The editors differ in the verse divisions here. The Canterbury Version puts both these questions in verse 10, the American Standard the first in verse 9, the second in verse 10.

 


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 9:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/rwp/view.cgi?book=1co&chapter=009&verse=009>. Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960.

  HOME    TOP

Dead links, typos, or HTML errors should be sent to corr@studylight.org
Suggestions about making this resource more useful should be sent to sugg@studylight.org
 

   Powered by LightSpeed Technology

Copyright © 2001-2019, StudyLight.org