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Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)

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 Chapter 39
Chapter 41
 
 
 
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Chapter 40

40:1  Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God.

Comfort

The first two verses of Isa. 40. give the key-note of the second part of the prophecy of Isaiah. The great theme of this section is Jesus Christ in His sufferings, and the glory that shall follow in the Davidic kingdom. (See "Christ in O.T.," sufferings,) Genesis 4:4; Hebrews 10:18 glory, ; 2 Samuel 7:8-15; Zechariah 12:8 Since Israel is to be regathered, converted, and made the centre of the new social order when the kingdom is set up, this part of Isaiah appropriately contains glowing prophecies concerning these events. The full view of the redemptive sufferings of Christ (e.g. Isa. 53) leads to the evangelic strain so prominent in this part of Isaiah. : 55:1-3).

The change in style, about which so much has been said, is no more remarkable than the change of theme. A prophet who was also a patriot would not write of the sins and coming captivity of his people in the same exultant and joyous style which he would use to describe their redemption, blessing, and power. In John 12:37-44 quotations from Isa. 53. and 6. are both ascribed to Isaiah.

40:22  It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in:

circle

A remarkable reference to the sphericity of the earth. See, also, Isaiah 42:5; 44:24; 51:13; Job 9:8; Psalms 104:2; Jeremiah 10:12.


Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Isaiah 40". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/srn/view.cgi?book=isa&chapter=040>. 1917.  

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