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C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David

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Chapter 26

  
 
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EXPOSITION

Verse 16. His own eyes were fixed upon God, but he feared that the Lord had averted his face from him in anger. Oftentimes unbelief suggests that God has turned his back upon us. If we know that we turn to God we need not fear that he will turn from us, but may boldly cry, Turn thee unto me. The ground of quarrel is always in ourselves, and when that is removed there is nothing to prevent our full enjoyment of communion with God. Have mercy upon me. Saints still must stand upon the footing of mercy; notwithstanding all their experience they cannot get beyond the publican's prayer, "Have mercy upon me." For I am desolate and afflicted. He was lonely and bowed down. Jesus was in the days of his flesh in just such a condition; none could enter into the secret depths of his sorrows, he trod the winepress alone, and hence he is able to succour in the fullest sense those who tread the solitary path.

"Christ leads me through no darker rooms
Than he went through before; He that into God's kingdom comes, Must enter by this door."

 

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

None.

 

HINTS FOR PASTORS AND LAYPERSONS

Verse 16. A desolate soul seeking heavenly company, and an afflicted spirit crying for divine mercy. Our God the balm of all our wounds.

Verse 16-18. David is a petitioner as well as a sufferer; and those sorrows will never injure us that bring us near to God. Three things he prays for: --

  1. Deliverance. This we are called to desire, consistently with resignation to the divine will.
  2. Notice. A kind look from God is desirable at any time in any circumstances; but in affliction and pain, it is like life from the dead.
  3. Pardon. Trials are apt to revive a sense of guilt. William Jay.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography Information
Spurgeon, Charles H. "Commentary on Psalms 25:16". "C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/tod/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=025&verse=016>. 1865-1885.


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