Statement of Faith | Tell a Friend about Us | Color Scheme:    
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Join Now!  |  Login
  Our Sponsors

• Try SwordSearcher Bible Software Today

• Hunting for choral music have you frustrated?

• Join a different kind of "Christian Book Club!" Click to find out how!

• Learn Greek, Aramaic, Biblical or Modern Hebrew online

 
  Study Resources

• Interlinear Bible

• Parallel Bible

• Daily Reading Plan

• Devotionals

• Commentaries

• Concordances

• Dictionaries

• Encyclopedias

• Lexicons

• History

• Sermon Essentials

• Audio Resources

• Religious Artwork

 
  SL Forums

• Apologetic Forum

• Christian Living

• Ministry Forum

• Evangelism Forum

• Passage Forum

• Help Forum

 
  Other Resources

• Advertise with SL

• FREE Resources

• Information

• Set Preferences

• Font Resources

• Contacting SL

 

 

C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David

Search This Resource
 
 
 
Navigator
PreviousNext
 Verse 16
Chapter 24
Verse 18
Chapter 26

  
 
  Printer friendly version
 
Additional Resources
 
 • Adam Clark Commentary
 • Burton Coffman
 • Gill's Exposition
 • Geneva Study Bible
 • Jamieson, Fausset, Brown
 • Matthew Henry Complete
 • Matthew Henry Concise
 • Treasury of Scripture
 • Wesley's Explanatory Notes
 
Buy This Resource
 
Paperback$17.49
Hardcover$41.97
 Show me more …
 

 

EXPOSITION

Verse 17. The troubles of my heart are enlarged. When trouble penetrates the heart it is trouble indeed. In the case before us, the heart was swollen with grief like a lake surcharged with water by enormous floods; this is used as an argument for deliverance, and it is a potent one. When the darkest hour of the night arrives we may expect the dawn; when the sea is at its lowest ebb the tide must surely turn; and when our troubles are enlarged to the greatest degree, then we may hopefully pray, O bring thou me out of my distresses.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

Verse 17. The troubles of my heart are enlarged. Let no good man be surprised that his affliction is great, and to him of an unaccountable character. It has always been so with God's people. The road to heaven is soaked with the tears and blood of the saints. William S. Plumer.

Verse 17. O bring thou me out of my distresses. We may not complain of God, but we may complain to God. With submission to his holy will we may earnestly cry for help and deliverance. William S. Plumer.

 

HINTS FOR PASTORS AND LAYPERSONS

Verse 16-18. David is a petitioner as well as a sufferer; and those sorrows will never injure us that bring us near to God. Three things he prays for: --

  1. Deliverance. This we are called to desire, consistently with resignation to the divine will.
  2. Notice. A kind look from God is desirable at any time in any circumstances; but in affliction and pain, it is like life from the dead.
  3. Pardon. Trials are apt to revive a sense of guilt. William Jay.

Verse 17. Special seasons of trouble and special resort to prayer for special deliverance.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography Information
Spurgeon, Charles H. "Commentary on Psalms 25:17". "C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/tod/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=025&verse=017>. 1865-1885.


  HOME    TOP

Dead links, typos, or HTML errors should be sent to corr@studylight.org
Suggestions about making this resource more useful should be sent to sugg@studylight.org
 

   Powered by LightSpeed Technology

Copyright © 2001-2018, StudyLight.org