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C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David

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 Verse 1
Chapter 34
Verse 3
Chapter 36

  
 
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EXPOSITION

Verse 2. Take hold of shield and buckler, and stand up for mine help. In vivid metaphor the Lord is pictured as coming forth armed for battle, and interposing himself between his servant and his enemies. The greater and lesser protections of providence may be here intended by the two defensive weapons, and by the Lord's standing up is meant his active and zealous preservation of his servant in the perilous hour. This poetic imagery shows how the psalmist realised the existence and power of God; and thought of him as a real and actual personage, truly working for his afflicted.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

Verse 2. Shield and buckler. The word rendered shield is in the Hebrew text (!gm), magen, which was a short buckler intended merely for defence. The word rendered buckler is (hnc) tsinnah; it was double the weight of the magen, and was carried by the infantry; the magen, being lighter and more manageable, was used by the calvary. The tsinnah answered to the scutum, and the magen to the clypeus, among the Romans. The word tsinnah, means that kind of shield from the middle of which there arose a large boss, surmounted by a dagger, and which was highly useful both as a defensive and an offensive weapon in ancient warfare. James Anderson, note to Calvin in loc.

 

HINTS FOR PASTORS AND LAYPERSONS

Verse 2. Jesus armed as the defender of the faithful.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography Information
Spurgeon, Charles H. "Commentary on Psalms 35:2". "C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/tod/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=035&verse=002>. 1865-1885.


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