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C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David

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EXPOSITION

Verse 1. Let my sentence come forth from thy presence. The psalmist has now grown bold by the strengthening influence of prayer, and he now entreats the Judge of all the earth to give sentence upon his case. He has been libelled, basely and maliciously libelled; and having brought his action before the highest court, he, like an innocent man, has no desire to escape the enquiry, but even invites and sues for judgment. He does not ask for secrecy, but would have the result come forth to the world. He would have sentence pronounced and executed forthwith. In some matters we may venture to be as bold as this; but except we can plead something better than our own supposed innocence, it were terrible presumption thus to challenge the judgment of a sin hating God. With Jesus as our complete and all glorious righteousness we need not fear, though the day of judgment should commence at once, and hell open her mouth at our feet, but might joyfully prove the truth of our hymn writer's holy boast --

"Bold shall I stand in that great day; For who aught to my charge shall lay?
While, through thy blood, absolved I am, From sin's tremendous curse and shame."

Let thine eyes behold the things that are equal. Believers do not desire any other judge than God, or to be excused from judgment, or even to be judged on principles of partiality. No; our hope does not lie in the prospect of favouritism from God, and the consequent suspension of his law; we expect to be judged on the same principals as other men, and through the blood and righteousness of our Redeemer we shall pass the ordeal unscathed. The Lord will weigh us in the scales of justice fairly and justly; he will not use false weights to permit us to escape, but with the sternest equity those balances will be used upon us as well as upon others; and with our blessed Lord Jesus as our all in all we tremble not, for we shall not be found wanting. In David's case, he felt his cause to be so right that he simply desired the Divine eyes to rest upon the matter, and he was confident that equity would give him all that he needed.

 

EXPLANATORY NOTES AND QUAINT SAYINGS

Verse 2. David appeals unto God to judge the righteousness of his heart towards Saul -- Let my sentence come forth from thy presence. From Saul and his courtiers there comes a hard sentence; they call me traitor, they call me rebel; but, Lord, leave me not unto their sentence, "Let my sentence come from thy presence;" that I know will be another sentence than what cometh from them, for thou hast proved me, and tried me, and findest nothing in me. Jeremiah Burroughs.

 

HINTS FOR PASTORS AND LAYPERSONS

Verse 2. Let my sentence come forth from thy presence.

  1. When it will come.
  2. Who dare meet it now.
  3. How to be among them.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography Information
Spurgeon, Charles H. "Commentary on Psalms 17:2". "C.H. Spurgeons's The Treasury of David". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/tod/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=017&verse=002>. 1865-1885.

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