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Holman Bible Dictionary

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DONKEYDOORKEEPER
 
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• Nave's Topical Bible
Door
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Door-keeper
Door-posts
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Door
Lexicons
Greek - door, doors
Greek - that keeps the door, doorkeeper, kept the door
Hebrew - door
Hebrew - door post, door posts, doorpost, doorposts
Hebrew - door
Hebrew - door
Hebrew - doors, door, door and leaves, doors had leaves
Hebrew - door, doorkeeper, doorkeepers
Hebrew - upper door post
Hebrew - door, doors, doorway, doorway at the entrance, doorways
DOOR

An opening for entering or leaving a house, tent, or room. At least five Hebrew words and one Greek term are translated “door” in the English Bible. The two most common Hebrew words have distinct usages, though they may be interchanged. Petha refers to the doorway, to the actual opening itself. Deleth alludes to the door proper, usually made of wood sheeted with metal, though a slab of stone could be used. The Greek term thura is used for both of these Hebrew words.

“Door” is often used in a figurative sense in the Bible. In the Old Testament, “sin lieth at the door” (Genesis 4:7) means that sin is very near. The valley of Achor, a place of trouble (Joshua 7:26), is later promised as “a door of hope” (Hosea 2:15). It will become a reason for God's people to trust Him again.

In the New Testament Jesus calls Himself “the door” (John 10:7,John 10:9). Faith in Him is the only way to enter the kingdom of God. God gave to the Gentiles “the door of faith,” or an opportunity to know Him as Lord (Acts 14:27). Paul constantly sought a “door of service,” an occasion for minisry in the name of Christ (1 Corinthians 16:9). Jesus stands at the door and knocks (Revelation 3:20). He calls all people to Himself, but will not enter without permission.

Bradley S. Butler


Copyright Statement
These dictionary topics are from the Holman Bible Dictionary, published by Broadman & Holman, 1991. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman & Holman.

Bibliography Information
Butler, Trent C. Editor.. "Entry for 'DOOR'". "Holman Bible Dictionary".
<http://classic.studylight.org/dic/hbd/view.cgi?number=T1653>. 1991.

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