Statement of Faith | Tell a Friend about Us | Color Scheme:    
Sunday, July 15, 2018

Join Now!  |  Login
  Our Sponsors

• Hunting for choral music have you frustrated?

• Try SwordSearcher Bible Software Today

• Join a different kind of "Christian Book Club!" Click to find out how!

• Learn Greek, Aramaic, Biblical or Modern Hebrew online

 
  Study Resources

• Interlinear Bible

• Parallel Bible

• Daily Reading Plan

• Devotionals

• Commentaries

• Concordances

• Dictionaries

• Encyclopedias

• Lexicons

• History

• Sermon Essentials

• Audio Resources

• Religious Artwork

 
  SL Forums

• Apologetic Forum

• Christian Living

• Ministry Forum

• Evangelism Forum

• Passage Forum

• Help Forum

 
  Other Resources

• Advertise with SL

• FREE Resources

• Information

• Set Preferences

• Font Resources

• Contacting SL

 

 

Holman Bible Dictionary

Start Your Search
 
 
Choose a letter from below
to display alphabetical list:

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M|N
O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|Y|Z|1|2
 
    Printer friendly version
 
PreviousNext
ANNUNCIATIONANON
 
Additional Resources
 
Dictionaries
• Baker's Evangelical Dictionary
Anoint
• Easton's Bible Dictionary
Anoint
• Fausset's Bible Dictionary
Anoint
• King James Dictionary
Anoint
Encyclopedias
• International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
Anoint, Anointed
Lexicons
Greek - anoint, anointed, anointing
Greek - anoint
Greek - anoint, anointed
Greek - anoint, anointed
Greek - anoint, anointed
Hebrew - anoint, anointed
Hebrew - anoint, anointed
Hebrew - anoint, anointed, anointing
ANOINT

describes the procedure of rubbing or smearing a person or thing, usually with oil, for the purpose of healing, setting apart, or embalming. A person can anoint himself, be anointed, or anoint another person or thing. While olive oil is the most common element mentioned in the Bible for use in anointing, oils produced from castor, bay, almond, myrtle, cyprus, cedar, walnut, and fish were also used. In Esther 2:12, for example, the oil of myrrh is used as a cosmetic.

The Hebrew verb mashach (noun, messiah) and the Greek verb chrio (noun, christos) are translated “to anoint.” From ancient times the priests and kings were ceremonially anointed as a sign of official appointment to office, and as a symbol of God's power upon them. The act was imbued with an element of awe. David would not harm King Saul because of the anointing the king had received (1 Samuel 24:6). Likewise, Israel (Psalms 89:38), and even Cyrus (Isaiah 45:1) are called God's anointed because of God's working through them. Israel came to see each succeeding king as God's anointed one, the messiah who would deliver them from their enemies and establish the nation as God's presence on the earth.

In the New Testament anoint is used to speak of daily grooming for hair (Matthew 6:17), for treating injury or illness (Luke 10:34), and for preparing a body for burial (Mark 16:1).

Christians see Jesus as God's Anointed One, the Savior (Acts 10:38). The same symbolism as in the Old Testament is employed in this usage: God's presence and power are resident in the anointing. Likewise, the Christian is anointed by God (2 Corinthians 1:21; 1 John 2:27) for the tasks of ministry.

Mike Mitchell


Copyright Statement
These dictionary topics are from the Holman Bible Dictionary, published by Broadman & Holman, 1991. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman & Holman.

Bibliography Information
Butler, Trent C. Editor.. "Entry for 'ANOINT'". "Holman Bible Dictionary".
<http://classic.studylight.org/dic/hbd/view.cgi?number=T346>. 1991.


  HOME    TOP

Dead links, typos, or HTML errors should be sent to corr@studylight.org
Suggestions about making this resource more useful should be sent to sugg@studylight.org
 

   Powered by LightSpeed Technology

Copyright © 2001-2018, StudyLight.org