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King James Dictionary

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Advocate
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Advocate
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Advocate
Lexicons
Greek - advocate, Advocate
Hebrew - advocate
Advocate -

AD'VOCATE, n. L. advocatus, from advoco, to call for, to plead for; of ad and voco, to call. See Vocal.

1. Advocate, in its primary sense, signifies, one who pleads the cause of another in a court of civil law. Hence,
2. One who pleads the cause of another before any tribunal or judicial court, as a barrister in the English courts. We say, a man is a learned lawyer and an able advocate.

In Europe, advocates have different titles, according to their particular duties.

Consistorial advocates, in Rome, appear before the Consistory, in opposition to the disposal of benefices.

Elective advocates are chosen by a bishop, abbot, or chapter, with license from the prince.

Feudal advocates were of a military kind, and to attach them to the church, had grants of land, with power to lead the vassals of the church war.

Fiscal advocates, in ancient Rome, defended causes in which the public revenue was concerned.

Juridical advocates became judges, in consequence of their attending causes in the earl's court.

Matricular advocates defended the cathedral churches.

Military advocates were employed by the church to defend it by arms, when force gave law to Europe.

Some advocates were called nominative, from their being nominated by the pope or king; some regular, from their being qualified by a proper course of study. Some were supreme; others, subordinate.

Advocate, in the German polity, is a magistrate, appointed in the emperor's name, to administer justice.

Faculty of advocates, in Scotland, is a society of eminent lawyers, who practice in the highest courts, and who are admitted members only upon the severest examination, at three different times. It consists of about two hundred members, and from this body are vacancies on the bench usually supplied.

Lord advocate, in Scotland, the principal crown lawyer, or prosecutor of crimes.

Judge advocate, in courts martial, a person who manages the prosecution.

In English and American courts, advocates are the same as counsel, or counselors. In England,they are of two degrees, barristers and serjeants; the former, being apprentices or learners, cannot, by ancient custom, be admitted serjeants, till of sixteen years standing.

3. One who defends, vindicates, or espouses a cause, by argument; one who is friendly to; as, an advocate for peace, or for the oppressed.

In scripture, Christ is called an advocate for his people.

We have an advocate with the father. 1John, 2.

AD'VOCATE, v.t. To plead in favor of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal; to support or vindicate.

Those who advocate a discrimination.

The Duke of York advocated the amendment.

The Earl of Buckingham advocated the original resolution.

The idea of a legislature, consisting of a single branch, though advocated by some, was generally reprobated.

How little claim persons, who advocate this sentiment, really posses to be considered calvinists, will appear from the following quotation.

The most eminent orators were engaged to advocate his cause.

A part only of the body, whose cause be advocates, coincide with him in judgment.


Copyright Statement
Dictionary of Words from the King James Bible. Public Domain. Copy freely.
Material presented was supplied by Brandon Staggs and was derived from the KJV Dictionary found on his website located at av1611.com.
The unabridged 1828 version of this dictionary in the SwordSearcher Bible Software at http://www.swordsearcher.com.

Bibliography Information
"Entry for 'Advocate'". "King James Dictionary".
<http://classic.studylight.org/dic/kjd/view.cgi?number=T134>.

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