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King James Dictionary

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worldlywormwood
 
Additional Resources
 
Concordances
• Nave's Topical Bible
Palmer-worm
Worm
• Treasury of Scripture Knowledge
A worm
Man; a worm, maggot
Dictionaries
• Easton's Bible Dictionary
Palmer-worm
Worm
• Fausset's Bible Dictionary
Worm
• Smith's Bible Dictionary
Worm
Encyclopedias
• International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
Canker-Worm
Palmer-Worm
Scarlet (worm)
Worm, Scarlet-Worm
Lexicons
Greek - worm
Hebrew - worm, worms
Hebrew - worm, worms
Hebrew - worm, worms
Hebrew - worm
Worm

WORM, n. G. This word is probably named form a winding motion, and the root of swarm.

1. In common usage, any small creeping animal, or reptile, either entirely without feet, or with very short ones, including a great variety of animals of different classes and orders, viz. Certain small serpents, as the blind-worm or slow-worm; the larvas of insects, viz. Grubs, caterpillars and maggots, as the wood-worm, canker-worm, silk-worm, (the larva of a moth (Phaloena,) which spins the filaments of which silk is made,) the grub that injures corn, grass, &c., the worms that breed in putrid flesh, the bots in the stomach of horses, and many others; certain wingless insects, as the glow-worm; the intestinal worms, or such as breed in the cavities and organs of living animals, as the tape-worm, the round-worm, the fluke, &c.; and numerous animals found in the earth, and in water, particularly in the sea, as the earth-worm or lumbricus, the hair-worm or gordius, the teredo, or worm that bores in to the bottom of ships, &c. Worms, in the plural, in common usage, is used for intestinal worms, or those which breed in the stomach and bowels, particularly the round and thread worms, (lumbrici and ascarides,) which are often found there in great numbers; as we say, a child has worms.
2. In zoology, the term Vermes or worms has been applied to different divisions of invertebral animals, by different naturalists. Linnes class of vermes, includes the following orders, viz. Intestina, including the proper intestinal worms the earth-worm, the hair-worm, the teredo, and some other marine worms; Mollusca, including the slug, and numerous soft animals inhabiting the water, particularly the sea; Testacea, including all the proper shell-fish; Zoophyta or compound animals, including corals, polypes, and spunges; and Infusoria, or simple microscopic animlacules. His character of the class is, --spiracles obscure, jaws various, organs of sense usually tentacula, no brain, ears nor nostrils, limbs wanting, frequently hermaphrodite. This class includes all the invertebral animals, except the insects and crustacea. The term Vermes has been since greatly limited, particularly by the French naturalists. Lamarch confined it to the intestinal worms, and some others, whose organization is equally imperfect. The character of his class is, suboviparous, body soft, highly reproductive, undergo no metamorphosis; no eyes, nor articulated limbs, nor radiated disposition of internal organs.
3. Remorse; that which incessantly gnaws the conscience; that which torments.

Where their worm dieth not. Mark 9.

4. A being debased and despised.

I am a worm, and no man. Psalm 22.

5. A spiral instrument or iron screw, used for drawing wads and cartridges from cannon or small arms.
6. Something spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm; as the threads of a screw.
7. In chemistry and distilleries, a spiral leaden pipe placed in a tub of water, through which the vapor passes in distillation, and in which it is cooled and condensed. It is called also a serpentine.
8. A small worm-like ligament situated beneath a dogs tongue.

WORM, v.i. To work slowly, gradually and secretly.

When debates and fretting jealousy did worm and work within you more and more, your color faded.

WORM, v.t.

1. To expel or undermine by slow and secret means.

They find themselves wormed out of all power.

2. To cut something, called a worm, from under the tongue of a dog.
3. To draw the wad or cartridge from a gun; to clean by the worm.
4. To wind a rope spirally round a cable, between the strands; or to wind a smaller rope with spun yarn.

To worm ones self into, to enter gradually by arts and insinuations; as to worm ones self into favor.


Copyright Statement
Dictionary of Words from the King James Bible. Public Domain. Copy freely.
Material presented was supplied by Brandon Staggs and was derived from the KJV Dictionary found on his website located at av1611.com.
The unabridged 1828 version of this dictionary in the SwordSearcher Bible Software at http://www.swordsearcher.com.

Bibliography Information
"Entry for 'Worm'". "King James Dictionary".
<http://classic.studylight.org/dic/kjd/view.cgi?number=T6505>.

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