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Commentary Critical and Explanatory
on the Whole Bible

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 Chapter 119
Chapter 121
 
 
 
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PSALM 120

      Ps 120:1-7. This is the first of fifteen Psalms (Psalms 120-134) entitled "A Song of Degrees" (Ps 121:1 --literally, "A song for the degrees"), or ascents. It seems most probable they were designed for the use of the people when going up (compare 1Ki 12:27, 28) to Jerusalem on the festival occasions (De 16:16), three times a year. David appears as the author of four, Solomon of one (Ps 127:1), and the other ten are anonymous, probably composed after the captivity. In this Psalm the writer acknowledges God's mercy, prays for relief from a malicious foe, whose punishment he anticipates, and then repeats his complaint.

      2, 3. Slander and deceit charged on his foes implies his innocence.
      tongue--as in Ps 52:2, 4.

      4. Sharp arrows of the mighty--destructive inflictions.
      coals of juniper--which retain heat long. This verse may be read as a description of the wicked, but better as their punishment, in reply to the question of Ps 120:3.

      5. A residence in these remote lands pictures his miserable condition.

      6, 7. While those who surrounded him were maliciously hostile, he was disposed to peace. This Psalm may well begin such a series as this, as a contrast to the promised joys of God's worship.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.

This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalm 120". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory
on the Whole Bible". <http://classic.studylight.org/com/jfb/view.cgi?book=ps&chapter=120>. 1871.  

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